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Snapshots of Excellence

News Feature

News & Events

April 18, 2012

BARTLETT COLLEGE OF SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS

Twins Adam and Allen Schaen have been featured in Bridgewater magazine after each excelled in his research pursuits. We also reported at that time that Adam had been accepted in to the Ph.D. program at the University of Minnesota. Now comes the news that Allen will complete this symmetrical picture: He's been accepted to a similar program at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Dr. Heidi Burgiel (mathematics and computer science) contributed to the latest edition of the OpenCourseWare on linear algebra course materials as published by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

More than 7,000 mathematicians from around the world attended the Joint Meetings of The Mathematical Association of America, The American Mathematical Society, and Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, held in Boston, including several math faculty members. Those who gave talks or organized sessions are: Dr. Annela Kelly, who presented "Probability Density Functions from Real-World Applications"; Dr. Laura Gross, "Linear Instability in a Combustion Problem"; Dr. Rebecca Metcalf, "CONNECT Math: A Partnership in Higher Education"; Dr. Shannon Lockard was one of the organizers of the MAA Invited Paper Session on the Beauty and Power of Number Theory, and presented "Multiple Choice Versus Open Response Assessment in Calculus," which was co-authored by Dr. Irina Seceleanu; Dr. Kevin Rion, "The Aluthge Sequence of a Shift Operator"; and Dr. Seceleanu presented "Cyclicity of vectors inducing an orbit with a non-zero limit point." Also presenting was student Thomas Howard. His poster, "A Mathematical Model for the Effects of Plaque Aggregation on the Neuronal Network," was featured at the MAA undergraduate poster session. Professor Seceleanu served as his mentor on the project, which built a mathematical model to study the effects of plaque deposits on the neuronal pathways in the human brain.

Four professors from mathematics and computer science published a paper, "A Code Snippet Library for CS1," in the journal of the Special Interest Group on Computer Science Education. The co-authors are Professors Toby Lorenzen and Abdul Satar, and Drs. Lee Mondshein, and Seikyung Jung.

Phil Scalisi was invited to participate in the centennial celebration of Arizona's statehood. He organized and presented material pertaining to mineralogy and crystallography, subjects that have played an important role in the history of Arizona. He also gave a presentation on the history of mathematics to students and faculty at Bridgewater-Raynham High School, and spoke on the non-Western history of mathematics to students and faculty at Bristol Community College.

Dr. Irina Seceleanu (mathematics and computer science) and Dr. Steven Haefner (chemistry) delivered a presentation on what first-year students know about mathematics when they enter BSU, what/when/how they are taught, and what they are expected to know. Additionally, she presented "Dichotomous Behavior for the Hypercyclicity of Weighted Shifts" at the Wabash Extramural Modern Analysis Miniconference at Indiana University.

Drs. Heidi Burgiel and Matt Salomone (both mathematics and computer science) published a paper on Logarithmic Spirals and Projective Geometry in M.C. Escher's "Path of Life III" in the Journal of Humanistic Mathematics.

Dr. Ward Heilman (mathematics and computer science) spent his sabbatical investigating elliptic curves and how they are used in elliptic curve cryptography (ECC). The study of elliptic curves by themselves forms "a fascinating and important branch of mathematics which played a central part in Wile's proof of Fermat's Last Theorem," he said. In addition, there is growing evidence that the use of elliptic curves over finite fields provides a faster and more efficient delivery of keys for both public and private key encryption schemes.

Dr. Annela Kelly (mathematics) published "Analysis of One-pile Misere Nim for Two Alliances" in the Rocky Mountain Journal of Mathematics.

Dr. Shannon Lockard (mathematics) gave a joint presentation with Dr. Jenny Shanahan, director of undergraduate research, on Inquiry-Based Learning entitled "Why Inquiry?" They discussed experiences with and thoughts on using IBL in the classroom. The presentation was sponsored by STREAMS (STudent Retention Enhancement Across Mathematics and Science).

Dr. Polina Sabinin (mathematics and computer science) has been awarded a CART summer grant to work on a publication resulting from her dissertation. She has also accepted an invitation to serve on the Mathematics Subcommittee for the statewide High Expertise Teaching (HET) project. HET is part of the Knowledge and Skills of Professional Teaching Project, which is sponsored by the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education and the Working Group for Educator Excellence.

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES

Ahmed Abdelal (special education and communication disorders) presented "Neurobiology & Neurophysiology of Racial and Ethnic Discrimination," at the Global Summit for Children, held in Washington, D.C.

Drs. Louise Graham and Michael Kocet (both counselor education) presented at the American Counseling Association, held in San Francisco. Dr. Graham co-led a pre-conference workshop on foundations of disaster mental health. She is a volunteer for the American Red Cross and this is a course that the organization requires all licensed mental health workers to take before they are eligible to be deployed to a national disaster. Her co-presenter was Mark LePore, from Pennsylvania State University, and together they certified 39 licensed professionals. Dr. Kocet manned the information booth for spirituality in counseling, a division of ACA. Graduate student Coleen O'Hanley also attended the conference, her first.

Dr. Phyllis Gimbel (educational leadership) was invited by Dr. John O'Donnell, the president of MassBay Community College, to attend the institution's 50th anniversary celebration. Professor Gimbel attended in her role as chairwoman of the board of directors of World of Wellesley, an organization dedicated to making the community a welcome and diverse place to live.

Dr. Nancy Witherell (elementary and early childhood education) was the subject of an article in Reading Today Online. Read her thoughts in this Q and A feature here

Dr. Stephen Nelson (education leadership) paper presented a paper at the Eastern Educational Research Association Annual Conference at Hilton Head, S.C. The paper was based on his new book, Decades of Chaos and Revolution: Showdowns for College Presidents, and is titled, "Cornell '69 and Kent State '70: Inevitable or Avoidable Tragedies for University Presidents, their Communities and the Nation?"

A group of students in a class lead by Dr. Lisa Battaglino (special education and communication disorders) has raised $1,200 for Dreams for Emily, an organization which supports the families that are involved with Chromosome 15q Duplication Syndrome. IDIC 15 is a genetic disorder believed to affect a child's physical features, cause developmental problems, and lead to medical problems such as seizures, ADHD, anxiety disorders, etc. The fund raising was done as part of a second-year seminar called Lead and Serve. The students involved were: Lisa DeSousa, Brandon Manning, Julie Aponte and Mike Niccoll.

RICCIARDI COLLEGE OF BUSINESS

Andrew Groth, '12, received the Outstanding Senior Award from the Boston chapter of Financial Executive International, an association of more than 14,000 treasurers, controllers, and other top financial executives from across North America. The accounting and finance major will graduate summa cum laude with a GPA of 3.93, and has already accepted a position at KPMG, and plans to earn his master's in accountancy and become a certified public accountant.

COLLEGE OF GRADUATE STUDIES

Carol Moran Miranda, G '12, who is earning her CAGS, co-authored a paper with Dr. Steven Nelson (educational leadership). "An Examination of Instructional Strategies for Vocabulary and Reading Comprehension Used by Grades 9-12 High School Teachers in English, Math, Science and Social Studies," was presented at the Eastern Educational Research Association Annual Conference, held in Hilton Head S.C. Carol was Dr. Nelson's graduate assistant.

COLLEGE OF HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES

Dr. Deborah Nemko (music) has been elected to the College Music Society Board. She is currently completing the term of a member who had to step down, and will begin her own term in January. "Your past leadership is highly valued by the Society, and we all eagerly anticipate your continued leadership for CMS in your role as Board Member for Performance," wrote CMS President David Brian Williams. The 9,000-member society is a consortium of college, conservatory, university, and independent musicians and scholars interested in all disciplines of music. Its Web site states its mission as promoting music teaching and learning, musical creativity and expression, research and dialogue, and diversity and interdisciplinary interaction. The society provides leadership and serves as an agent of change by addressing concerns facing music in higher education. Also, Dr. Nemko will travel to China at the end of April to perform at the Shanghai Cultural Center with violinist, Mei-Mei Wei, as well as do a residency at Shanghai Normal University as a visiting scholar.

Dr. Kevin Donnelly (political science) has a new book that examines the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Foreign Remedies: What the Experience of Other Nations Can Tell us about Reforming Health Care was co-authored with Dr.
David Rochefort, arts and sciences distinguished professor at Northeastern University.
The book is published by Routledge. More information is available here

Dr. Wendy Haynes (political science) moderated a discussion panel at the annual conference of the American Society for Public Administration (ASPA) titled, "Infrastructure Megaproject Leadership, Accountability, and Performance: A Long and Winding Road." The conference was held in Las Vegas, and this year's theme was "Redefining Public Service through Civic Engagement." Jody Lehrer, a student in the master's of public administration program, was part of the panel. Ms. Lehrer, who has a law degree, and works full time as the community development coordinator for the town of Weymouth, has been collaborating with Dr. Haynes for more than 18 months. Together, they examined ten transportation-related megaprojects, mostly on the East and West Coasts. They presented their findings at the ASPA conference; Ms. Lehrere's attendance was made possible by a travel grant from the College of Graduate Studies.

Dr. Deniz Zeynep Leuenberger participated in the Women as Global Leaders Conference, held in Abu Khabi, United Arab Emirates. She joined speakers from South Africa, Sweden, Lebanon, Kuwait and other countries to present on and discuss the impact of environmental degradation on women's well being. Her presentation focused on the economic tools that inform women's sustainability leadership.

Philosophy major Matthew Keogh, '12, has been accepted into the master's program at Clemons University.

Dr. Aviva Twersky Glasner (criminal justice) will be presenting her research at the bi-annual conference of the National Association of the Deaf in Louisville, Ky. Her work will be presented as part of a panel, "Deaf in Prisons: Results, Reasons and Responses." Her co-presenter is Shannon Reese.

ALUMNI

Two criminal justice alumni have been accepted into advanced degree programs at top universities. Michelle Cubellis, '10, will pursue her Ph.D. at in criminal justice at John Jay University in New York City. Kallee Spooner, '12, has been accepted to the master's program at Sam Houston State University in Texas. Each will continue her studies in the criminal justice field.

Dr. Kyung-shick Choi (criminal justice) and Benjamin Shimp, '11, have published an article entitled "Qualitative Analysis of Motivated Offender and Suitable Target: Methodological Challenges on Hacker Study" in the Korean Journal of Social Science (Volume 14, Issue 2). This peer-reviewed journal is well known among comparative social science scholars around Asia. The paper's topic had served as Mr. Shimp's senior thesis.

ADMINISTRATORS

Brian Salvaggio, assistant vice president of Student Affairs, is the winner of the Pillar of Mentorship Award, given by the Massachusetts College Personnel Association. The award is given to an administrator who has made a lifetime commitment to the field of higher education through service and leadership in the profession. The letter nominating Mr. Salvaggio credited his mentorship, sense of humor, approachability and the ability to see matters from a variety of perspectives.

Dr. Tony Esposito, assistant vice president for Student Affairs, and Dr. Michael D. Young, associate provost for Academic Planning and Administration, co-authored an article published in The Journal of Assessment and Institutional Effectiveness. The article, "Measuring Educational Gains from Participation in Intensive Co-Curricular Experiences at Bridgewater State University," featured another co-author: Dr. Cathryn Turrentine, former assistant director of Institutional Research and Assessment at BSU and current director of institutional research at Keene State College.

Cindy Kane, director of Student Involvement and Leadership, was elected to the National Association of Campus Activities' board of directors.

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